The Fantasy Country

3 11 2010

[Yes, I realise that ‘The Lucky Country’ was an ironic term and one of the most widely abused/misused in Australian culture. But trust me, I’m being at least ironic.]

Apart from a need to just write something, anything, before 12 months elapses since I last did, this has been bugging me more and more lately.

Australia has become a fantasy land. Up is down, black is white; climate change doesn’t exist and we best burn more and more of that lovely coal. Read the rest of this entry »

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any ETS is both an emissions floor and an emissions ceiling

19 06 2009

I’ve updated my thinking on the importance of Richard Denniss’ exposition of the futility of voluntary action under the CPRS.

I think Denniss’ expression of this reality of the CPRS as proposed was a reasonably novel perspective. The fact that it represents a ceiling as well as a floor for abatement is not something I’d really seen stated explicitly before. But it’s not a flaw of the CPRS per se, it’s how any ETS works. In fact, in many ways it’s kind of the point.

Why?

Read the rest of this entry »





Kevin Rudd has sold us out to the coal lobby

17 12 2008

So, my loyal readers (… hah!), it’s been a while.

I won’t bother linking to the storm of condemnation of the Australian Rudd government’s betrayal that is the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. I might write up my own take on the White Paper when I can control the rage enough to read it.

But here’s a letter to our Prime Minister Rudd in protest. I will send it on to a few other politicians for good measure. Of course I know it won’t change anything directly, but every voice counts. As Greenpeace say, what would you tell your children?


Don’t sell our future to the coal lobby

Prime Minister,
Words can barely express my dismay and outrage at your government’s grossly inadequate greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Read the rest of this entry »





Jury finds preventing GHG emissions a valid legal reason for Kingsnorth protestors’ actions

12 09 2008

From BBC News: ‘six Greenpeace activists have been cleared of causing criminal damage during a protest over coal-fired power’.

“When 12 normal people say it is legitimate for a direct action group to shut down a coal-fired power station because of the harm it does to our planet then where does that leave government energy policy?”

Good news for once!

And commentary on the implications of this for UK government polices — and around the world — from John Vidal:

… the signals which this gives out for climate change protestors, and goverments around the world, is very very clear: coal is dirty, coal is dangerous, and it is now, seemingly, legal to target it [my transcript from the audio]